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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I just stumbled across this article in the April 19 CS Monitor. The expense of gasoline may soon become the least of our worries when budgeting in the cost of driving. Insurance rates are already sky rocketing due to the expense of repairing newer cars. In addition, having more cars totaled means fewer cars around. Both new and used car costs are certain to increase as a result.



http://www.csmonitor.com/2004/0419/p13s02-wmgn.html
 

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The article doesn't really account for cars being considered more sacraficial these days. Your parent's Chrysler New yorker would look like new after a major accident, but you'd have a set of corpses inside, or maybe tossed out onto the roadway. These days the cars are obliterated but people live. Let the chassis absorb those g's instead of your body.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Macabre said:
The article doesn't really account for cars being considered more sacraficial these days. Your parent's Chrysler New yorker would look like new after a major accident, but you'd have a set of corpses inside, or maybe tossed out onto the roadway. These days the cars are obliterated but people live. Let the chassis absorb those g's instead of your body.
That's true, but the issue is the cost of minor hits (less than 20mph, say). I don't think the writer would argue that the increased repair costs are not related to increased safety. I think it may even be inevitable. Regardless, as five year old $30,000 cars begin to be totalled by relatively minor accidents, insurance premiums will soar.
 

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Possibly, but it also means there's a much greater availability of parts for the cars they do repair - which should help temper it somewhat, and might even reduce demand for stolen cars (OK, that's a reach 8) ). I blame a lot of it on the ridiculous 5mph bumper laws. For one, it's B.S., as anyone who parks parallel to the street can attest. For two, it makes the bumpers much more expensive to fix in more common, slightly higher speed benders.
 

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<tangent>IMHO, most light-damage "fender benders" result in an even split between the cost of parts+labor and the cost of painting the part to match. Often, parts are replaced because the ins. co's body shop claims it can't match color on a spot repair.

Many trucks and suv's have unpainted "armor" on the wear strips, wheel wells, front and rear bumpers, etc. If all cars had these easily-replaceable body parts the repair costs would be much lower. VW/Audi do this to an extent with their unpainted rear valences and lower side trim.

Then again, maybe drivers would be even more aggressive if they didn't have to protect their shiny new paint.</tangent>
 

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I am surprised Christian Science dosen't believe that the car will heal itself if it is meant to be...

The rise is car repair costs will be offset by the increased safety of cars. Medical payments are the big liability with insurance. Prices may go up a bit, but nothing astronomical, things will balance out.

And why did you get an article from the CS monitor??
 
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