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Discussion Starter #1
Assume the position...

This result from my other post on no start/no starter... Now that I got this far I can:
  • Remove the seized alternator
  • Remove the frigged starter
  • Replace the short rad tube that’s probably the last piece of original rad piping
Yay!

This is now my covid-19 isolation project...

99055

99056
 

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Discussion Starter #2
Alternator is out!

I didn’t have to disconnect any rad hoses at all. Just remove the #8 Allen bolt mount for the.. power steering lines??

Anyway, first remove the alternator bolts: #8 Allen top and 13mm lower (have to lift that ps line support above the bolt to pull it out).
Then wriggle the alternator forward to get at the back of it easier to unplug and take off the 13 mm bolt lead.
Then carefully push down on the lower rad hose under the front of the alternator and again carefully wriggle forward AND rotate sideways to grab the back end and front end together and ‘roll’ it out between the upper and lower hoses. Had to stop multiple times to ensure the hoses weren’t snagged.
99057


but it looks like I have to replace that lower hose anyway.. pretty frail
 

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Discussion Starter #3
The alternator is verified as ‘frigged’. I had to use my breaker bar to even try to rotate it... griiiiind!
 

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I might have missed a back story here, but how long have you had this car?
What are your intentions with the car, keep for daily use, back-up car?

I'm noticing that by the looks of what you got there in that picture, as long as your in service position (mostly anyways) I'd have a looksee at the timing belt and all of it's associated components.
Again, I don't your history with the car, but if the timing belt hasn't been changed in the last 80k miles (130,000 kilometers for you) your running on borrowed time.

Those coolant hoses have seen better days.
 

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Discussion Starter #5 (Edited)
The car has 220K km. This car was supposed to be a ‘great starter car for my son’ as offered by the helpful neighbour... it was running fine, albeit for short runs, before I bought it.... not for much at all. I did the calculations and if I replace the bad parts, it’s still cheaper than a better condition used car with more unknown problems. I do know how this car was used to this point and its service history. I don’t know about the timing belt, so good point. I’ll look at that as well. But it looks like everything was serviced before my neighbor got it. The rad coolant came out as though it was brand new fluid, telling me that must have been serviced in the last year, maybe two. Without seeing sediment or oil in the coolant gave me hope for the car and that’s why I started. In the end, it might cost $3K to $4K in parts.
 

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The alternator is verified as ‘frigged’. I had to use my breaker bar to even try to rotate it... griiiiind!
It's always satisfying to put hard work into removing something suspect and it actually be busted. What stinks is when you remove a suspected broken part and it's just fine.
 

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Ok, that's good info.
So roughly 137k miles on it. That's not bad at all for a car at least 15 years old.
I'm with you on the costs of fixing the car versus buying a 'newer'. I've posted plenty of stories and yes even a few rants on how I justify fixing my 1998 V6 GLS sedan.
It's by far the most reliable vehicle I've ever owned. Some other people I'm sure have not had the same luck (if you want to call it that) as I've had.
You're a new member, so you probably don't know any of my history here. I'll be straight up honest, I've had a few hiccups with the car, engine quit running back in 2006 from failed CCT's. Extensive engine damage from that. Fortunately I've had the means to do all of my own wrenching. After letting the car sit for a few years, I swapped in a used replacement motor in early 2013. Did a complete timing belt job, complete refresh on every hose under the hood, complete PCV refresh, complete front suspension refresh including a steering rack. That's been 7 years now. Holy crap time is going by fast. Since then I've made multiple trips across the country from WI to CA and WI to AZ before moving to Phoenix, and then countless trips from Phoenix, AZ to Burbank, CA.
I bought my car for $1k. I've probably spent around $4,500 ~ $5,000 since I've bought it, that includes the 19" wheels and tires I bought for it in the early days of ownership.
I've posting here for the last 2 years about how I need a new clutch cause I think it's going to go any day. Yeah well, it's still going.
But all this of course is just my own experience.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Oh, and yes, the coolant lines are already on order. I got one of them already and the old one looks very swollen in comparison!
 

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Discussion Starter #9
I think the timing belt looks rather newish and is very taught.

Right:
99060


Left:

99061
 

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Ok, that's good info.
So roughly 137k miles on it. That's not bad at all for a car at least 15 years old.
I'm with you on the costs of fixing the car versus buying a 'newer'. I've posted plenty of stories and yes even a few rants on how I justify fixing my 1998 V6 GLS sedan.
It's by far the most reliable vehicle I've ever owned. Some other people I'm sure have not had the same luck (if you want to call it that) as I've had.
You're a new member, so you probably don't know any of my history here. I'll be straight up honest, I've had a few hiccups with the car, engine quit running back in 2006 from failed CCT's. Extensive engine damage from that. Fortunately I've had the means to do all of my own wrenching. After letting the car sit for a few years, I swapped in a used replacement motor in early 2013. Did a complete timing belt job, complete refresh on every hose under the hood, complete PCV refresh, complete front suspension refresh including a steering rack. That's been 7 years now. Holy crap time is going by fast. Since then I've made multiple trips across the country from WI to CA and WI to AZ before moving to Phoenix, and then countless trips from Phoenix, AZ to Burbank, CA.
I bought my car for $1k. I've probably spent around $4,500 ~ $5,000 since I've bought it, that includes the 19" wheels and tires I bought for it in the early days of ownership.
I've posting here for the last 2 years about how I need a new clutch cause I think it's going to go any day. Yeah well, it's still going.
But all this of course is just my own experience.
You however have failed to mention that the ol' girl still has the original rotors and pads..........it's not like you use the brakes a lot.......maybe "tapped" them once between Burbank and Phoenix
 

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Discussion Starter #13
I feel bad for whoever designed how the starter was bolted to the engine... he must have had a hard day and took it out on the design... frig this is awful

99064
 

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Yeah the trip between Phoenix and Burbank is pretty much hammer down. The only time I stop is at the AZ / CA border. I top off because gas is like a $1.50 less per gallon on the AZ side.

Honestly, I only have record of replacing the brakes once on that car. On the face of things for being a 22 year old car now, that seems absolutely ridiculous and impossible. Don't forget, the car sat for almost 7 years from late 2006 to early 2013.
 

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I think the timing belt looks rather newish and is very taught.
Meh,
That looks like a Genuine Audi/VW belt. They can go a looong time and still look pretty good. Looks are very deceiving.
Remember, the timing belt and associated pulleys/bearings are mission critical on the V6's and 1.8's. Makes me wonder sometimes why VW engineers even considered a timing belt.
These are interference engines. You loose a timing belt while the engine is running, all of your valves are history. It is MUCH cheaper and easier to refresh the timing belt and it's components compared to the alternative. There are countless posts in this forum supporting that fact.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
The timing belt is the only thing that scares me to try, exactly because it’s super important. Mind you, over the last month my confidence has been boosted by looking at YouTube videos made by guys who don’t have an ounce of common sense when approaching a problem... seriously some of the things people do or don’t do really makes you shake your head. But perhaps what bothers me the most is the ones where people just don’t care or are impatient. Then why start?? I may get into the timing belt just because it does make sense to do so at this point. Sorts the same as: if you drop the tranny, why wouldn’t you change the clutch if it has 200K on it?? That sorta thing...
 

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Sorts the same as: if you drop the tranny, why wouldn’t you change the clutch if it has 200K on it?? That sorta thing...
Precisely.
 

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I'll say this, if you decide to delve into the timing belt replacement, there are plenty of us here that can and will guide you through every step of the way.
 

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Discussion Starter #19
I'll say this, if you decide to delve into the timing belt replacement, there are plenty of us here that can and will guide you through every step of the way.
I really do appreciate everyone’s help.
 

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Just looking at your starter, I will go out on a limb (just a small one) and say I think believe the starters failure involves the #50 or #30 terminal/connection.... they look suspect
 
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