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Discussion Starter #1
Ok, really just a general question as I've never owned a VW before this Passat.

2015 Passat Wolfsburg 1.8t

Wife drives around 80 highway miles a day, maybe 5 city. She drives like a pussy.

Rotors are already warped and VW says new pad and rotors needed. 34,000 miles.

Is this common with these vehicles? I don't remember the last vehicle I had that need brake work this early on.

~ryan
 

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Yeah, I had some mild pad deposits on the front rotors of my 04 Passat. Your rotors aren't warped, they just seem that way from the pad deposit getting "registered" through the brake pedal on every revolution of your front rotor(s).

Unfortunately, for most people*, the way to prevent pad deposits is to complete 98 percent of your braking with ~25-40 feet to spare. Then use that last 25 feet to let the car roll slowly to a stop with light or zero pedal pressure (you obviously won't be doing this if stopping on an incline).

*The driver's ed method used by most people to stop from any speed is to wait until almost the last minute, then threshold brake until the car comes to a complete stop...then continue holding the brake pedal firmly after the stop (so those poor brake pads can bake a portion of themselves onto the rotor). :banghead:

To solve the pad deposit issue, thus saving the cost of a new set of front rotors, get some 240 grit sandpaper and sand both sides of each rotor at the point where you see pad deposits. Obviously if you ask the stealership to do this, you'll be humiliated from the laughing, so it may be best to have a reputable shop give you a quote on the rotor "resurfacing" (don't have these rotors turned...you'll need the extra mass for heat dissipation). You only need to remove ~0.0005" to 0.001" or less from each side of the rotor to get rid of the deposits....rotor turning machines remove far more metal.

You can also change to new pads, but unless someone changes their braking behavior ;), those resurfaced rotors won't last 9 months until the dreaded "pad pulse" comes back.
 

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Mercedes for the 1980's cars used to have special abrasive brake pads for the dealers to install to clean rotors. I guess to just drive around the dealership! Not too sure how well they stopped! Wonder if VW has something like that?
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Good to know, thanks for the info Electron Man. I have the lease paid off on it and my wife wants me to purchase the car. I have a purchase price of $11,500 and only have 34,000 miles on the car so I am having a hard time not buying it, but I didn't want to purchase a vehicle that needs constant pampering (i.e brake jobs every 30,000)
 

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Well there could be a much simpler reason for the brake wear. I had a girlfriend who used to brake with the left foot and accelerator with the right. People like that also seem to rest their left leg on the brake pedal, just saying !
 

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Except for a few manual cars I had when younger, I've been a right on the gas, left on the brake driver for 41 years. It feels more natural to me. But I don't rest my left foot on the pedal.
 

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Although I've had brakes last over 100,000 miles, I would argue that normal brake pad replacement happens anywhere between 30,000 - 100,000 miles. Very similar to tires. These are both wear items. IMHO nothing to worry about.
 

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All depends on braking habits. I agree with the pad material imbedded in part of the rotor causing a pulsation. Fwiw, my 2014 Passat had 36k on it when sold and probably had over 50% pad left.

Also, it's damn near impossible to rest your foot on the brake enough to move the pads without it interrupting the accelerator signal by design.

Sent from my TouchPad w/Android 5.0 using Tapatalk
 
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