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Discussion Starter #1
hi so i have had my passat 4yrs and 3 out of the 4 yrs I drove it.so it sat for a yr because the pick up screen was clogged so i payed $1,000 to have it fixed but the auto mechanic didnt bother to tell me that the coolant flang needed to be done as well so that would be another $618.00.so i went and bought the parts and the coolant and i started to work on it but im no mechanic.ive put the replaced the coolant senor and thats about it.im not scared of learning but i am scared of fucking up my car.any ideas?
 

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The coolant flange on a 1.8t is notoriously fiddly since it's way in the back of the engine bay and access is limited. It just bolts on but getting to some of the bolts is difficult. Also, there are some o-rings that can stick in place that need to be replaced and since everything has to be done by feel those can cause issues if you miss one. If you are limber and patient I'm sure you can replace the flange. Be careful of all the plastic bits back there are they can get brittle and break. Read up on the procedure here first and be sure you have a day or two of free time and all the parts handy before starting. If you get stuck, you can always ask here for advice but once the coolant lines are open you can't drive the car until the job is done.
 

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If you haven't yet purchased a replacement flange, you may want to consider getting a genuine VW part. Aftermarket parts can sometimes be problematic, but on this one, replacements seem particularly leak-prone.
 

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in dire need of an organic chemistry lesson
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Regardless of either you or someone else would change the flange I strongly recommend that you get an aluminum one not the plastic. Given changing the flange is not an easy task, the last thing you want to happen is that it leaks again (which happened to me and others).

For this particular part replacement, you need to remove the Kombi valve. It has a very thin metal gasket. When you want to put it back the gasket will fall making it very tedious job. The trick is to use a piece of regular tape to temporarily attach the gasket to the valve body so it won't fall. After you have the bolts secured in place then pull the tape out and you are good to go.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Regardless of either you and someone else would change the flange I strongly recommend that you get an aluminum one not the plastic. Given changing the flange is not an easy task, the last thing you want to happen is that it leaks again (which happened to me and others).

For this particular part replacement, you need to remove the Kombi valve. It has a very thin metal gasket. When you want to put it back the gasket will fall making it very tedious job. The trick is to use a piece of regular tape to temporarily attach the gasket to the valve body so it won't fall. After you ave the bolts secured in place then pull the tape out and you are good to go.
thank u :)
 

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Discussion Starter #7
You dont know how much that helped me i appreciate it so much.i do have one question thow ive gotten most of the hoses disconnected does the combi valve have to be romoved? the less i have to take off the better off ill be at putting it all back together.lol.this job is a bitch.but the link u sent was amazing ;):sneaky::).Im really doin this all on my on.
 

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2004 B5.5 Variant 1.8T
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I am in the "less removed the better" camp, and I removed the combi valve. Frees up so much room. Basically, when you go to put the flange on, you are bear hugging the engine, if you can picture that. Arms coming in from both sides. That combi valve would be in the way and make for a very frustrating install if left on.
 

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I second VAGguy's comment about removing the combi valve. I've done it both ways and it was much easier changing the flange with it out of the way.

One note on Emry's install pdf from ECS Tuning. Most of those instructions apply to the B5.5, but there are some differences. There is no rubber hose as shown in step 23. The long metal tube that runs from the front of the engine to the back (pictured in step 22) bolts directly to the flange.
 

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I remove the 2 upper bolts of the combi and pivot out of the way on the lower bolt. This keeps the gasket from getting lost. It also helps to take pictures with your cell phone to see what you are working on (or a mirror).
 

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I second what PZ said. Having done this job many times (just 3 days ago was the most recent), I learned not to take out all 3 bolts on the combi valve.
In the past I have spent up to an hour, just trying to line up the holes on that damned metal gasket on that valve. Never again!
A mirror helps too, though at this point I do it all by feel.
 
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