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Discussion Starter #1
My fuel pump went out on me today. Got a new one and followed a youtube video on how to remove the old one. In the video it seemed pretty easy to twist the actual fuel pump free by hand, but my experience was horrible. I tried and tried and it wouldn't budge. Finally I got a wrench in there and luckily managed to use enough brute force to break it free.

Then I got the new pump assembled and ready to put in. I tried for an hour to get the new pump set back in place. It was even harder than getting the old one out! I know there's a VW tool specifically for this and I can see why. Wondering if anybody has any tips or insight to share. Anyone in the Seattle area have a tool and want to help a brother out?

I ended up leaving the pump loose and sealing it up. The car is running great, but I imagine the fuel pump in moving around a bit in the tank. Appreciate any help!
 

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The pump should have a notch/ arrow on the top to show the correct orientation. You need to clock it in order for it to fit properly inside.
Once this is done correctly, tightening the locking ring should be a snap.


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There are indeed "timing" marks to line up. I think you'll find a notch in the pump basket, and two lines molded into the base. You line up the right hand notch, rotate to lock at the other. Use large crossed screwdrivers or similar bars to engage with the big square notches in the top of the pump basket. Makes turning the pump easy.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
The pump should have a notch/ arrow on the top to show the correct orientation. You need to clock it in order for it to fit properly inside.
Once this is done correctly, tightening the locking ring should be a snap.


Thanks for the response! Are you talking about the fuel pump cover that has the threaded ring? I'm referring to the actual pump that is down below.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
There are indeed "timing" marks to line up. I think you'll find a notch in the pump basket, and two lines molded into the base. You line up the right hand notch, rotate to lock at the other. Use large crossed screwdrivers or similar bars to engage with the big square notches in the top of the pump basket. Makes turning the pump easy.
One of the big problems was that I had just filled my tank the night before the pump failed, so I'm reaching into a full tank at night. Very difficult to line up timing marks. Very good to know they are there! I will open it up on a nearly empty tank and follow your directions. Thanks a ton!
 

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Are you talking about the fuel pump cover that has the threaded ring? I'm referring to the actual pump that is down below.
I do mean the actual pump. You will notice the top rim of the cylindrical "basket" has large notches. That's for the VW tool, but is perfect for the alternative method of crossed bars. I just changed the pump in my A4, and just grabbed a convenient pair of aluminum angle pieces about a foot long each. Any metal tools strong enough and able to push against the sides of two notches works. Just make the bars cross in the middle, hold the upper ends in your hands, bars lower ends each in a notch, then twist clockwise (after you've ensured the basket is in the tank's plastic frame in the initial position. Give a twist and it should rotate 15 degrees as it snaps into place.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
I do mean the actual pump. You will notice the top rim of the cylindrical "basket" has large notches. That's for the VW tool, but is perfect for the alternative method of crossed bars. I just changed the pump in my A4, and just grabbed a convenient pair of aluminum angle pieces about a foot long each. Any metal tools strong enough and able to push against the sides of two notches works. Just make the bars cross in the middle, hold the upper ends in your hands, bars lower ends each in a notch, then twist clockwise (after you've ensured the basket is in the tank's plastic frame in the initial position. Give a twist and it should rotate 15 degrees as it snaps into place.
Thank you so much. Very clear! I'm going to get this done tomorrow! Thanks!
 

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The orientation is the key. Pay attention to how the old one was orientated...just hold it above the tank based on how the fuel lines attach. Install exactly the same way. You will turn clockwise to lock it in place. I have done several of these with no special tools...get it lined up and turn by hand. I did this on a full tank once...not pleasant having your entire hand in fuel but still doable.

When you have it lined up correctly, as I recall, it sits down a bit so you know. Then just turn it.

Z
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Unfortunately, I did not look at orientation when I removed the original. I'm about to start ad going to hope I can line up by hash marks. I will take a photo of correct orientation when I get it in and post it up!
 

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Make sure that you have a bright flashlight. Also try to hang onto it, I dropped mine and it sat submerged in fuel, nicely lighting up the tank like a swimming pool light. There will be alignment marks; lines molded into the plastic tank frame, and one somewhere on the pump basket. It may be the triangular notch on the upper rim that you use; I'm going from memory but just inspect it. Also, if at all possible, use long rubber gloves to keep gasoline off your skin. I had a best-friend who died of kidney cancer at 45- he owned an auto repair shop and had the bad habit of getting such chemicals on his hands and arms daily. Can't say that is what caused the cancer, but I really avoid being in contact with liquid solvents or vapors.
 

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2020 here. 2002 B5.5 wagon V6
I had a helluva time trying to get my new one in. I actually broke the outside "basket housing" trying to install it. I ended up dissembling the new pump housing and re assembled with the old OEM one.
IT SNAPPED RIGHT IN PLACE IN THE TANK. No tools needed at all.
Should have done that from the start. I think the after market Bosch pump just wasn't made 100% like the OEM.
 
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