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Engine stalled on the way home from work yesterday. Cranked, no start. Turned key off. Turned key back on, waited a few seconds, cranked and the engine fired, but only for a half second. Cycled key a few times, waited longer, and engine will run for 2-3 seconds, but then die.

I'm guessing fuel pump has failed. It's the original fuel pump.

Does anyone have the OEM part number for the pump on my car? Vin number is WVWVD63B62E251783.

Thanks!
 

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2002 Volkswagen Passat Wagon GLX 4Motion
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292,000 miles

Engine stalled on the way home from work yesterday. Cranked, no start. Turned key off. Turned key back on, waited a few seconds, cranked and the engine fired, but only for a half second. Cycled key a few times, waited longer, and engine will run for 2-3 seconds, but then die.

I'm guessing fuel pump has failed. It's the original fuel pump.

Does anyone have the OEM part number for the pump on my car? Vin number is WVWVD63B62E251783.

Thanks!
Do not guess on this one. Know. Many, many tests to perform to ensure it is the fuel pump before you buy new. I just did a fuel pump on my '02 GLX, and the one I got from Amazon an Herko, was cheap enough and works well.
 

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All 1.8T and 2.8 FWD passats from 99-2005 used the same pump. Audi VW Electric Fuel Pump (A6 Passat) - VDO 8E0906087D
Before throwing parts at it, I would check for codes and fuel pressure first.
No codes, no check engine light. There's no compatible fitting on the fuel rail - how do I connect my fuel pressure tester to it for testing?
 

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You'll need to find a fitting for it or mount one inline.

To test incoming, mount inline with the supply line which is a crew on fitting. To test fuel pressure regulator, do it on the return line like shown.
 

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A quick check is to listen to the pump when you turn the key to on but not start and to measure the resistance across the motor inputs. There are 4 wires going to the pump. The 2 heavy ones are for the pump itself and the 2 smaller ones are for the fuel level sensor. If the resistance across the 2 heavy wires > about 2 ohms the pump is bad although I've seen cases where the measurement is fine and the pump still doesn't work.
 

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A quick electrical test of the fuel pump is to measure motor resistance, which should be just a few ohms.

Conveniently, the fuse (28) is downstream of the fuel pump relay, so you can just measure resistance to ground at Fuse #28. If your probe won't fit in the little test holes on the back of the fuse, you can remove it. The relay side should measure open circuit; the fuel pump side should measure just a few ohms. You can also apply +12V at the fuse and listen for the pump to run.

For both of my failed fuel pumps, the motor resistance was very high.
 

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Engine stalled on the way home from work yesterday. Cranked, no start. Turned key off. Turned key back on, waited a few seconds, cranked and the engine fired, but only for a half second. Cycled key a few times, waited longer, and engine will run for 2-3 seconds, but then die.

I'm guessing fuel pump has failed. It's the original fuel pump.

Does anyone have the OEM part number for the pump on my car? Vin number is WVWVD63B62E251783.

Thanks!
Find these three things.
fuel
Spark
Timing.
these three thing is a must when starting a car.
step one is to see if the fuel injectors is pushing fuel
Two is to check to see if the spark plugs is sparking and check the spark gap.
three check your timing belt.

Edit: the timing belt is a hard thing to fine and it happens a lot. If you have a noninterference engine and timing is off the car will not start. That’s also for all three things.
 

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Engine stalled on the way home from work yesterday. Cranked, no start.

Does anyone have the OEM part number for the pump on my car? Vin number is ...
OP, it doesn't sound like your case, since your car fired once, but Engine Speed Sensor is a common failure that will cause crank, no start. Crank continuously for at least 5 seconds to bypass it.

As for the fuel pump, most of us don't have access to VIN lookup. Model year, engine, and FWD/4-motion would get it, though. I believe there's a like to Etka (which many dealers use) in the sticky posts.
 

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Here is an easy way to check if the FP is pumping.
Disconnect the return hose from the FPR,
Connect a hose from the FPR to a suitable container
Connect 12V to fuse #28
If there is a good flow of fuel, the FP is pumping.
If there is no flow of fuel, the FP is NOT pumping.
 

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2002 Volkswagen Passat Wagon GLX 4Motion
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My Herko replacement fuel pump buzzes for a second or so when the key is first switched to ON...If you are not hearing this buzz from under the rear seat, you have a good clue. No fuel pressure at the rails is another good sign. Last is voltage at the pump harness but no buzzing from that pump once the connections have been made. yeah...that's the part that got me. Pump died on the road...I thought...replaced, still no start...Took a while to diag that harness and pump connectors were not mating properly.
 

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I have found that common issues of mysterious stalling/starting can be:
ECU/ECM relay (located in the ECU box)
Fuel Pump relay (you can possibly hear the fuel pump run)
Fuel Pump (you can test for fuel pressure along with its relay)
Ignition Switch electrical portion (this can be a fun one to diagnose)
Engine Speed Sensor (Crank Sensor) sometimes throws a code
 

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You'll need to find a fitting for it or mount one inline.

To test incoming, mount inline with the supply line which is a crew on fitting. To test fuel pressure regulator, do it on the return line like shown.
That video is wrong, you can't check the regulator by measuring at the return line.
You would get the same reading (maximum pump pressure) whether the FPR is working or not.
The FPR can only be checked by measuring pressure at the supply line.
You could check maximum pump pressure at the return line, but this would cause the pump to stall and may damage the FP.
 
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