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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi All- My Passat is out of time on bank 2 (DTC #17755, 16684, 16688, 16689, 16690).

17755 P1347 Bank2,Crankshaft-/Camshaft os.Sens.Sign. Out of Sequence
16684 P0300 Random/Multiple Cylinder Misfire Detected
16688 P0304 Cyl.4 Misfire Detected
16689 P0305 Cyl.5 Misfire Detected
16690 P0306 Cyl.6 Misfire Detected

Cylinders 4, 5, and 6 are missing at idle, and the car idles unevenly. When I pulled the bank 2 (driver's side) valve cover, I see that the plastic pad on the cam chain adjuster is missing (and I don't even see the remains!), and the adjuster has been worn down considerably by the chain. The intake cam also looks to be off the mark at TDC (see pic), which I assume is causing the misfires. I did not hear any noise from the chain, so I was surprised to see it so worn.

I think I will replace the chain and adjuster (considering a junk yard adjuster with new chain pads, since the new adjusters are so expensive).

Question: What is the easiest way to replace the chain and adjuster? Do I need to pull both camshafts (and therefore the timing belt, sprocket, back covers, etc.) in order to replace the chain, or can I use a camchain tensioner tool (must order one asap) to raise the intake cam, remove the adjuster and and pull off the chain without removing the timing belt?

I appreciate any insight. I've seen a few write-ups on the tensioner seals, but nothing on replacing the chain and tensioner directly.

Here is the worn down chain adjuster... yikes!

Metal Brass Gold Food

Here is the timing mark on the intake camshaft (with everything at TDC), not quite lined up.

Auto part Metal Gear Automotive engine part Brass

The exhaust cam was lined up correctly, and I replaced the timing belt two days ago with a lock bar on the sprockets, so everything is lined up with the exhaust cams / crankshaft / timing belt. Unfortunately, I put everything back together, and do not want to have to tear it all down again to install a new tensioner and chain, if I can avoid it.

I appreciate any advice!
 

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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
Per the advice of a helpful guy at Blauparts, I have pulled everything off the front again and removed the timing belt and Bank 2 cam sprocket in order to more easily change the cam chain tensioner and chain. I was able to pull everything off in 90 minutes, which is a personal record.

I have ordered some parts from Blauparts, a new chain from germanautoparts.com (since Blauparts did not carry it), and am also renting the tensioner tool from Blauparts. Hopefully I can find a used chain tensioner locally, replace the chain and pads and get it all back together with the correct # of links in between the sprockets.

I'll let you know how it goes.
 

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Consider yourself VERY lucky. I've heard stories of CCT guides breaking and/or failing apart and down into the internals causing major damage. With so much potential for blowing your engine, just having to replace the CCT and chain is a good thing. Of course, while you've got things apart, you should take some time to search for that missing/broken pad. If it's still floating around, then you're still in danger of it causing something catastrophic to occur. If you're even luckier still, then you'll find it sitting at the bottom of your oil pan. If you can't see it anywhere internally, then do an oil change and drop the pan to check for any pieces that need to be cleaned out.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I'm at a loss to explain where the pad went, but should probably drop the oil pan as you suggested to be on the safe side. I suppose I should count myself lucky!

I installed the new pads onto a replacement CCT from the local U-Pick-It lot, and everything is now back together and working great. The idle is smooth, no misfires and no more check engine light. YEAH! Here is a pic of the new chain, replacement CCT and new pads:

Auto part Engine Fuel line Vehicle Automotive engine part

It took me three tries to get the camshafts lined up correctly (lightly bolting the caps down and checking the alignment marks on the cam caps). I wasn't completely confident whether I had 15 or 16 links between the sprockets, but I trusted the fact that the marks were aligned on the third try.

I notice some minor lifter noise on both banks when the car first starts and idles. I haven't noticed this before, but probably wasn't listening too closely either... I've always used conventional Castrol 5W-30. Would it help to switch to synthetic after I change oil / drop the pan? Is there any drawback to switching to synthetic with a motor that has 137K on it?
 

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I'm at a loss to explain where the pad went, but should probably drop the oil pan as you suggested to be on the safe side. I suppose I should count myself lucky!

I installed the new pads onto a replacement CCT from the local U-Pick-It lot, and everything is now back together and working great. The idle is smooth, no misfires and no more check engine light. YEAH! Here is a pic of the new chain, replacement CCT and new pads:

View attachment 5785

It took me three tries to get the camshafts lined up correctly (lightly bolting the caps down and checking the alignment marks on the cam caps). I wasn't completely confident whether I had 15 or 16 links between the sprockets, but I trusted the fact that the marks were aligned on the third try.

I notice some minor lifter noise on both banks when the car first starts and idles. I haven't noticed this before, but probably wasn't listening too closely either... I've always used conventional Castrol 5W-30. Would it help to switch to synthetic after I change oil / drop the pan? Is there any drawback to switching to synthetic with a motor that has 137K on it?
Sorry to bring this back but I've started having the same problems, I have the car torn apart at the moment with parts on the way, I was wondering how to I retime the camshafts without touching the timing belt?
 

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You will not likely get a response from them as it was almost 10 years ago.

You can time the one cam that isn't run off the belt directly, but in order to time the other cam to the crank (per head), you must remove the timing belt or at least loosen the pulley. Not so sure about the pulley. Waiting for @AndreasPassat to set me straight.
 

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Sorry to bring this back but I've started having the same problems, I have the car torn apart at the moment with parts on the way, I was wondering how to I retime the camshafts without touching the timing belt?
Can you please elaborate on the "torn apart at the moment"?
What exactly do have loosened or removed?
Pictures would be the best. No guessing with a picture.

@VAGguy is correct.
The intake cam static timing can be adjusted without messing with the timing belt or pulley.
However, the exhaust cam timing must be lined up with the cam timing marks in order to get the intake timing correct.

If the static timing of the exhaust cam is not correct for whatever reason (crankshaft pulley timing mark lined up with TDC mark AND camshaft timing mark lined up with cam cap) the cam pulley would have to be loosened and re-timed with the cam bar locking tool.
 
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