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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I have an 04 V6 (approx 166000mi) with the CEL on returning the codes P0021 - camshaft position timing overadvance and P1522/17930 - camshaft adjustment malfunction. There was a misfire when the CEL first came on, but I haven’t noticed one since. I’ve driven about 200 miles since the light first came on, had the codes reset a couple times, but they keep coming back. The engine now makes a noise (see YouTube video at link further below) and there is a notable burning oil smell that was not there prior. I changed the oil about 1,000 miles ago and slightly overfilled it. I let it be at first, but since the CEL came on, I took enough out that the dipstick now reads at the appropriate level. The timing belt was changed 66,000 miles ago. I opened up the panels as much as possible without taking the front of the car off, and it appears to still be in good shape.

I’m familiar with the general meaning and possible causes of the codes - but am looking to see if anyone has any additional information and perhaps a rough idea on what it may cost to repair.
 

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I’m familiar with the general meaning and possible causes of the codes - but am looking to see if anyone has any additional information and perhaps a rough idea on what it may cost to repair.
Just a suggestion; don't assume that the readers of your post will also be familiar with those trouble codes. Folks could look them up, but you'll help yourself by mentioning what they mean.

In this case, the codes refer to a cam timing issue on bank 2 - the driver's side. Oil burning is probably a separate problem, but a noise might be due to the chain tensioner. Other people, such as PZ or AndreasPassat, are better advisers about that.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Just a suggestion; don't assume that the readers of your post will also be familiar with those trouble codes. Folks could look them up, but you'll help yourself by mentioning what they mean.

In this case, the codes refer to a cam timing issue on bank 2 - the driver's side. Oil burning is probably a separate problem, but a noise might be due to the chain tensioner. Other people, such as PZ or AndreasPassat, are better advisers about that.
Thanks for the suggestion, I’ve added more details on the codes. Thanks!
 

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Sounds like a bad CCT. If you can, park the car as there is a chance the chain can skip and damage the valves. I would start with pulling the valve cover and seeing if the pads on the CCT have failed or if it's just the hydraulics.

To change the CCT, it's easiest to remove the timing belt as the rear timing cover limits the movement of the CCT. If you are doing the work yourself, just make certain the timing is 100% before trying to start the car. If you are paying for the work, you probably want to replace the timing belt and components as 75% of the work overlaps. I've seen the V6 belts last anywhere from 75k-110K, with the OEM parts lasting on the high side of that.
 

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I concur with PZ on this.
Hopefully you have a second mode or alternate transportation. I would not drive the car with that kind of noise coming from it.
That sounds eerily similar to what my V6 sounded like when the CCT's failed.
The valve cover needs to get removed to inspect the general overhaul condition of the CCT. While inside, check the camshaft chain to see if it is slack or has tension on it. If it slack, your guaranteed the CCT has got an issue.
As PZ mentions, Genuine VW/Audi timing components usually go well beyond the recommended change interval. But considering your pretty close to another timing belt change, I would bite the bullet and do a complete timing refresh and tackle the CCT along with it.
After removal of the valve cover I would try to be cognizant of the amount oil pooled up inside the crevices, nook and crannies. There should be ample oil laying around in pools. All of the components under the valve cover should have a oily sheen to them. If there is no oil pooling or it 'looks' dry, you're probably dealing with a common issue where the shoes/pads of the CCT(s) have broken up and found there way to oil pickup screen and starving the engine of oil. As long as you don't drive it anymore, I don't think you'll have to worry about any major damage to the engine. One of my V6's was pretty bad and was driven for weeks and didn't suffer any further damage other than the CCT's already being junk.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Thanks for the input everyone...I think you're spot on about what's going on. Unfortunately this looks like it's above my skill ability to do myself, does anyone have a rough guess on what this might cost for a shop to repair? Both the dealer and a local shop quoted about $1300 to replace the timing belt/components, and it looks like the CCT itself is $300ish for an aftermarket part - so does at least $1600 seem accurate?

I also have a truck - so I'll definitely keep the car stationary while I do some additional research and figure out my next move.
 

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You can remove the valve cover yourself and have a look/take a picture. It would help is assessing damage.

If you add your location, someone might have a cheaper local shop. I would think most local shops to be closer to $1K, with the dealer at $1300. The CCT is expensive, but with the 50%+ overlapping labor, it might not be as bad cost-wise. Since you are not doing the work, check the cost of only the CCT labor. There are people who can replace it without pulling the front into service position (besides me). It saves half the labor costs or more vs doing both.
 
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