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Discussion Starter #1
I have a 2003 Passat TDI with an 1.9 AVF engine and a 01V 5HP19 Tiptronic auto transmission. Purchased the car last year with 300K km and a bad transmission, reverse issues due to oil pump bushing and a broken drum but not the D-drum. I replaced it with a used trans and, after testing,removed the valve body and re-build it using a Trans-Go kit. I also bought another trans with a D/G drum broken.
I drove the car for about 15K km testing and observing how the trans operates. The TCC is engaged early so the trans is producing very little heat, especially on country roads. When the engine gets above 180*F the trans fluid is bellow 90*F so the stock cooler in the coolant radiator is not helping warm-up the trans fluid. It actually prolongs warm-up time so the first thing I did was add an external spin-on filter and an inline Permacool thermostat using 8AN lines and fittings like this

Next step is adding an air/oil Setrab cooler but I would also like to add an Audi A6 water/oil cooler inthe passage from the thermostat to the trans that avoids the external cooler like this

That would help warm-up the trans faster but I wonder how much will it hurt passenger compartment warming in the winter.
I have more diagrams in my photo album here for those interested https://www.passatworld.com/forums/members/pitzury-albums-trans-fluid-cooling-warmup.html
 

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If you're willing to go through all this work, then you could manual swap it and not have to deal with the inherent problems of the 01V.

But for your plan here, it might prolong the time it takes for the heat in the car to get warm, but I don't think it'll pose an issue, especially if you let the car warm up a little when it's cold. You never really see people looking to get heat into automatic transmissions, though. Interesting to say the least.

Also to clarify, you're wanting to disconnect the original trans cooler in the radiator for a new one?
 

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I have to applaud you for that Engineering exercise and clear diagrams, which looks like something a large military vehicle might have. However, I doubt that there will be any real world benefit to your Passat's transmission. My 'ole 1996 A4 had 270,000+ miles on it's 5HP19 when I sold it, still shifting and working perfectly fine as-is.

Warming up engine oil fast is important, one reason being the tendency of moisture to accumulate in the crankcase if combustion gasses leak past the piston rings. That's the job of the "oil cooler", to transfer heat from coolant to the oil during warm-up. Hot oil drives off the water, which the crankcase ventilation system directs into the intake system. The automatic trans doesn't have that problem.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Cannot go manual, the wife never drove a manual. Plus I enjoy driving an automatic in city traffic. Another car I have is a manual 2004 4Motion.

I do have a Webasto stationary/additional engine heater that I should install but I don't believe there is enough space for it after the water/oil heater install. We'll see next winter.
I drove the car this winter in -10-+10*C ambient and noticed that these transmissions tend to run too cool most of the time if ambient is under 10*C. Unless you live in a city with 1st-2nd gears drives, it takes forever to get the trans fluid temp up to 40*C and then it barely gets up to 65-70*C and that is with an external inline thermostat. When engine coolant is 80*C the trans is at less than 35*C so the radiator does not help with trans warm up. On the contrary it cools the fluid in stock configuration. I have an external spin-on filter and a 77*C rated thermostat installed to avoid the coolant radiator up to about 70*C yet I only gained about 5*C temp increase in warm up on the morning drive . The last 5 months of cold weather the temps stayed at less than 60*C most of the time except 2-3 instances of low speed traffic in the hills part of the city.
On the other hand if it's summer or the car is driven in traffic 1st-3rd gears fluid in the oil pan gets up to 100*C or more and at the outlet pipe to the cooler where the oil comes from the unlocked torque converter it is even higher. The factory heat exchanger in the coolant radiator is too small to cool the fluid in these circumstances.
That's why I plan to use the factory trans cooler for power steering as soon as I install the air/oil Setrab cooler.

BMW's using 5HP19 transmissions have a water oil cooler which is fed through an 80*C coolant thermostat. There is an intricate system attached to the radiator and the Trans cooler gets warm coolant until the thermostat opens the passage from the radiator. Too complicated in my opinion.
My setup is meant to also help in case the inline thermostat decides to stop working. No matter where the thermostat would get stuck the trans fluid would be cooled.
 

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Discussion Starter #5 (Edited)
I know it may seem overkill but I never had a car that I did not modify, especially where the factory cut some corners.
Another reason for these modifications is trans fluid flush. Replacing all the trans fluid on most cars is next to impossible because of the fluid in the torque converter. Some manufacturers, like Mercedes,installed a drain plug on the converter to solve that. I talked to some reputable shops that rebuild torque converters in the US and they refuse to add a drain plug when rebuilding one. Since I cannot do what these guys Diagnostics & Services | Ventura, CA | Dave Wilkes Transmissions , I had to look for other ways to replace as much fluid as possible when changing fluid and filter
On the side of these 5HP-19 transmissions ( https://forum.e46fanatics.com/showthread.php?p=16735393#post16735393 ) there is a 10x1 mm plug on an internal passage that communicate with the torque converter. It is basically the feed to the converter. I did not try yet but I believe that pushing clean fluid through that passage will eventually replace all the dirty fluid from the converter. Blowing air in there exits the input shaft into the converter. And I believe the better part of the dirty fluid would exit through the cooling out line. Disconnecting the line between the trans and external filter can let us know to stop when the fluid coming out is clean.
Than we can replace the external filter and flush the coolers and even fill the rest of the transmission before it is started for final level adjustment.
These are the other benefits of the cooling modifications I am doing. Lines are -8AN and disconnecting and plugging lines to flush the trans and coolers is not that difficult.
Anybody tried this before?
Pictures added in my album https://www.passatworld.com/forums/members/pitzury-albums-trans-fluid-cooling-warmup.html
 

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I did plenty of modifying of cars/motorcycles in the past, and understand the satisfaction that can bring. But for me, I've seen no benefit to purging all of the ATF; it will be 2/3 fresh every time you change it. I posted some time back a photo of my B5 A4's transmission pan right after removing it, having used Valvoline Maxlife ATF. Prior to using that fluid, I had initially dropped the pan, cleaned it thoroughly, then installed a new filter. There had been one fluid change after about 35,000 miles of Maxlife use, but without a pan drop, so the second ATF change brought the concentration of Maxlife to around 90%. After 70,000 miles, the interior of the pan was found to be just wet with fluid, practically no clutch residue and nothing on the magnets. So from my perspective, there would be no gain from trying to cool it more or purge more original fluid.
 

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Discussion Starter #7 (Edited)
I bought this car for my wife. We live 10 km from the city limits and my wife goes to school with our 3 boys in the morning and drives back in the afternoon. The way it is now the trans runs cold all the time and it can overheat in heavy traffic. I installed a Isspro EV2 that has a programmable warning light and programmable module to turn a fan on at the desired temperature. But I don't expect my wife to watch that gauge, actually I would rather have her watch the road.
Let's be honest. VW have financial directors that decide what the end product is. W8 and some V6 Passats have an additional cooler and thermostat plumbed in series with the one in the coolant radiator.https://www.passatworld.com/forums/...-vw-phaeton-v8-3d0-317-810-c-4d0-317-027.html
BMW's have both heating and cooling https://www.passatworld.com/forums/...cture89451-coolant-flow-bmw-5hp19-cooler.html
I can do better than that with not so much effort.

Also this engine will be tuned to more HP and Torque numbers as soon as I am done with cooling mods. Plus the car has a trailer hitch and you never know when I will need to tow something. I like to drive it especially after switching to sport mode and after installing factory 1BE sport suspension and FSD shocks.

Wait until I succeed installing a dipstick on this transmission! There seems to be some room in the left front where the harness exits. Than you can say that I am over doing it. Yes I am that crazy.

Oh and one more thing: how hard would have been for the factory to turn the electrical radiator fan on when the fluid reaches a certain temperature? And why you can monitor engine temp in the transmission section on a 2004 Audi A4 Multitronic but not on a VW Passat. Do you want me to go on?
I worked at Subaru and Audi/VW dealerships and built racing engines of all kinds but never cared for automatic transmissions. Now, I guess being older I started being interested in these auto transmissions.
 

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My son-in-law is U.S. born of Romanian parents, speaks Romanian, and he is a car-guy too. Worked for Mercedes, Porsche, and Tesla dealerships as a technician, now with Karma as a technical representative for that company.
 

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Discussion Starter #9 (Edited)
Magnetic filtration

I always said that the more modified the car is, the more the owner is trying to compensate in the manhood department. Well, all my cars were heavily modified over the years :).

Did I talk about magnetic filtration? I bought a bunch of SrFe magnets to put the on the external filter and plan to remove and cut the filter open when I add the Setrab cooler. The next filter will have the Magnesaver neodynum magnets that I purchased. Curious to see what happens.

Back to my question. I decided to use WIX filters and don't know which one to chose between WIX 51525 that has a By-Pass valve and 21 micron rating or the WIX 57088 that has no By-Pass valve and a 10 micron rating. As far as I know good quality filters like the Filtran (the filter that comes from ZF on the 5HP19) have a 30 micron rating. Some say 40-60 Tranny Filter Tech | Trailer Life. All I know is the 4 valve bodies I opened up had a lot of debris in them. I would like to limit that to a minimum. So do I really need a by-pass valve? Almost tempted to run the 57088 in the summer and the 51525 in the winter.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Magnetic filtration

I replaced the factory water/fluid cooler with the front mount air/fluid cooler. I also added a Magnom Mini magnetic inline filter on the cooling Out line between the trans and the external filter. This is a good thing to do considering what I found inside the external filter after I cut it open. I had installed a bunch of simple Ferrite magnets stuck on the outside of the filter that collected this
Who knows how much more iron particles missed the magnets or were washed away. Magnom is supposed to retain almost all iron on the first pass and keep them trapped.
The next filter I installed has 4 small Neodym magnets on the entry of the filter and 7 Magnesaver https://www.magnesaver.com/info.htm instaled like this: 4 pcs to the upper side of the filter and 3 more at a lower level. The idea is to see which is last magnetic barrier.

I was extremely surprised to see so much magnetic particles after the torque converter but it seems that it was because the converter was on its way out. It started to make noises and took out the oil pump bushing in 2 days after installing the new filters. So adding an external spin on filter and magnetic filtration is a great idea.
But the question is how much iron particles are ingested by the oil pump and circulated through the Valve Body since the factory filters are not filtering small but dangerous particles? The ultimate step would be to also have magnetic filtration on the factory filter and that is what I am working on.
 

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I would question how well your radiator is working, at least the trans cooler portion of it. Perhaps the lines are collapsed or clogged. Every Tip trans I have worked on warmed up quickly. When I was monitoring mine when the 1st TC failed (long before the manual swap), it consistently warmed and held temps even with the TC locked.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
If there would be a restriction, the transmission would overheat not stay cool.
And, if you look at the schematics at the beginning of the thread, you will see that the thermostat directs the fluid back to the transmission if it is colder than 71*C. Idid not install the warming up coolant/oil radiator yet.
Also I believe that being a Diesel engine the software is designed to lock the torque converter sooner than a gas engine.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
100105
Passat oil pump bushing Magnom .jpeg
It took a while but I am back. The metal shavings I found when I first removed the oil filter were the beginning of the end of the transmission. At the time I added a Setrab front mount air/oil cooler and a Magnom filter before the remote spin-on filter. The torque converter bushing went bad on the first day of test drive. The oil pump bushing spun and metal shavings were everywhere. The picture shows the metal shavings trapped by the Magnom filter.
Two days ago I installed another transmission that I reconditioned with new seals and replaced the broken D/G drum. I also installed the Audi A8 water/oil heat exchanger as a warm-up helper since it is installed on the return path from the thermostat. It warms up so much faster now and keeps the temperature above 70*C. The thermostat regulates the fluid temperature and flow through coolers. Operating temperature in the oil pan is now at 80-82*C. The temp gauge senzor at the torque converter exit shows up to about 8*C temp raise of temperature when there is a lot of TC slippage but the big cooler is doing its job keeping the oil in the transmission at 82*C.
I also installed an oil pressure gauge. I am surprised that the pressures are no more than 30 PSI when cold and at about 25 PSI at normal driving. There are also some scary pressure dips to 5 PSI for about 2-3 seconds right after 2-3 and 3-4 shifts. When that happens, N215 valves amperage goes down to about 0.049 A from the 0.5-0.6 A when the pressures stay at 25 PSI. I am worried what happens then with the lubrication. I installed a valve body with no modifications which I will replace with one that will have the pressure regulator fix and new seals as soon as I gather enough data.
 

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Great work. I've seen a couple of spun oil pump bushings as well as blown front seals. I expect (but can't say for certain) that the reduced pressure at the gear shifts are programmed for smoother shifts.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
01V Pressure Control Valve N91 has the responsibility of regulating the entire amount of ATF required to operate the transmission. This morning test drive revealed that, up to about 60*C, the dip is only about 5 PSI( from 25 to 20 PSI) like it is at all the other shifts. Above 60*C the pressure drops from 25PSI to 10 PSI, when trans temp is less than 70*C, and down to 5 PSI, when above 70*C. Again: the dips are only at shifts between 2-3 and 3-4, they happen not at shifting but after the next gear was already selected and seem to coincide with the TC slip regulation activated. That is why I believed that the pressure is reduced because of the flow reverse in the TC. But the question is do I have leaks when hot in the valve body that need to be compensated. I have a valve body prepared that has the Trans-Go Pressure valve kit and new seals but, for comparison it would make more sense to recondition the valve body that is in now with that kit and reinstall for testing.
 

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Discussion Starter #18
100117

Pressure sensor on the external thermostat on the cooling lines.
The only thing missing in the above picture is the Magnom thermostat which is located on the cooling outline before the remote spin-on filter.
 
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