Battery replacement: B5 Passat

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  1. #1
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    Battery replacement: B5 Passat

    This was the most insanely difficult battery replacement ever. I can't believe how hard VW made it to get at the battery on this car! I figured, "hey, how hard can this be?" Then I started reading a few other posts on this topic and figured I had better proceed with caution.

    A few caveats about doing this replacement that I learned from other threads on this forum:

    1. If you disconnect the power to the ECU, the car loses track of an adjustment for the throttle body and the car runs like crap, if at all. You will then (most likely) need a VAG-COM to reset the adjustment. Moral of the story: Provide another power source to the car while replacing its battery.

    2. Make VERY sure the battery you get fits properly. Some other posters have reported that the replacements they got were slightly too small and/or lacked the hydrogen vent hole (charging batteries give off hydrogen...hydrogen + spark = BOOM)

    So, here is the detailed writeup on how to perform this task:

    1. Locate the correct size battery. The proper size is 94R. Accept no substitutes; many sources have the wrong size code in their books.

    2. Peel back the weather seal that helps retain the plastic cover over the battery, master cylinder and ECU area.

    3. Remove the plastic cover. This reveals the battery but does not provide enough clearance to actually remove it.

    4. Remove the metal retaining clip that holds the battery in place. There is a hard-to-see bolt (13mm) that has to come out; it's just forward of the battery. You'll need an extension for your socket wrench.

    The "water deflector" (a.k.a. the cowl, attached to the bottom of the windshield) has to come off to provide full clearance for the battery to be removed.

    5. Remove the wipers...not the blades, the wipers themselves! This is done by popping the plastic bolt caps off with a flatblade screwdriver and then removing the 13mm nuts that hold the wiper arms in place. Mine were stuck pretty bad--I had to really work at them to get them to come off. A bit of penetrating oil and a rubber mallet are your friends here. Wiggling them back and forth finally got them loose after pounding on them for a while. Make note of where the wipers line up against the windshield before removing them completely.

    6. Remove the "hinge covers" at the edges of the water deflector. This will require a Torx T-30 tool. I had to move the hood up and down a bit to work them loose and remove them.

    7. Remove the two metal clips from the leading edge of the water deflector. This can be done by hand.

    8. Remove the water deflector.

    9. While the battery terminals are still connected to the battery, attach a set of jumper cables to them while leaving room to still loosen the terminal nuts. Connect the jumper cables to another power source, such as an extra battery or another car. This is crucial since if you disconnect power from the car, you will lose crucial ECU settings for the "Throttle body adaptation." Search the forums for this term to see what I am talking about.

    10. Carefully remove the battery terminals...WITHOUT interrupting the connection to the external power source!

    11. Disconnect the vent hose from the side of the battery.

    12. Now, after all of that, you can FINALLY remove the battery. Be careful not to knock the jumper cables off the battery terminals! Having someone hold the positive terminal out of the way is a big help here. The sucker is HEAVY, watch out!

    13. Put the new battery in the car and carefully reconnect the terminals. Again, use caution not to knock the jumper cables loose.

    14. Reassemble all the crap you had to take off the car. A few choice curse words for the German engineers that made this task so difficult are a fine companion to this task.

    FYI: A few posters on this site have mentioned that the area at the bottom of the windshield must be VERY clean before the water deflector will reattach properly. One even mentioned that a small stone got trapped beneath the deflector and cracked his windshield! As such, I cleaned mine pretty thoroughly and had very little trouble getting it reattached.

    I thought it was absurd to have to take the back seat out to get at the battery in my Audi, but this makes the Audi look like simple and elegant--at least that only took two screws and then the battery was easy to reach!

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  3. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by mdgorelick View Post
    This was the most insanely difficult battery replacement ever. I can't believe how hard VW made it to get at the battery on this car! I figured, "hey, how hard can this be?" Then I started reading a few other posts on this topic and figured I had better proceed with caution.

    A few caveats about doing this replacement that I learned from other threads on this forum:

    1. If you disconnect the power to the ECU, the car loses track of an adjustment for the throttle body and the car runs like crap, if at all. You will then (most likely) need a VAG-COM to reset the adjustment. Moral of the story: Provide another power source to the car while replacing its battery.

    2. Make VERY sure the battery you get fits properly. Some other posters have reported that the replacements they got were slightly too small and/or lacked the hydrogen vent hole (charging batteries give off hydrogen...hydrogen + spark = BOOM)

    So, here is the detailed writeup on how to perform this task:

    1. Locate the correct size battery. The proper size is 94R. Accept no substitutes; many sources have the wrong size code in their books.

    2. Peel back the weather seal that helps retain the plastic cover over the battery, master cylinder and ECU area.

    3. Remove the plastic cover. This reveals the battery but does not provide enough clearance to actually remove it.

    4. Remove the metal retaining clip that holds the battery in place. There is a hard-to-see bolt (13mm) that has to come out; it's just forward of the battery. You'll need an extension for your socket wrench.

    The "water deflector" (a.k.a. the cowl, attached to the bottom of the windshield) has to come off to provide full clearance for the battery to be removed.

    5. Remove the wipers...not the blades, the wipers themselves! This is done by popping the plastic bolt caps off with a flatblade screwdriver and then removing the 13mm nuts that hold the wiper arms in place. Mine were stuck pretty bad--I had to really work at them to get them to come off. A bit of penetrating oil and a rubber mallet are your friends here. Wiggling them back and forth finally got them loose after pounding on them for a while. Make note of where the wipers line up against the windshield before removing them completely.

    6. Remove the "hinge covers" at the edges of the water deflector. This will require a Torx T-30 tool. I had to move the hood up and down a bit to work them loose and remove them.

    7. Remove the two metal clips from the leading edge of the water deflector. This can be done by hand.

    8. Remove the water deflector.

    9. While the battery terminals are still connected to the battery, attach a set of jumper cables to them while leaving room to still loosen the terminal nuts. Connect the jumper cables to another power source, such as an extra battery or another car. This is crucial since if you disconnect power from the car, you will lose crucial ECU settings for the "Throttle body adaptation." Search the forums for this term to see what I am talking about.

    10. Carefully remove the battery terminals...WITHOUT interrupting the connection to the external power source!

    11. Disconnect the vent hose from the side of the battery.

    12. Now, after all of that, you can FINALLY remove the battery. Be careful not to knock the jumper cables off the battery terminals! Having someone hold the positive terminal out of the way is a big help here. The sucker is HEAVY, watch out!

    13. Put the new battery in the car and carefully reconnect the terminals. Again, use caution not to knock the jumper cables loose.

    14. Reassemble all the crap you had to take off the car. A few choice curse words for the German engineers that made this task so difficult are a fine companion to this task.

    FYI: A few posters on this site have mentioned that the area at the bottom of the windshield must be VERY clean before the water deflector will reattach properly. One even mentioned that a small stone got trapped beneath the deflector and cracked his windshield! As such, I cleaned mine pretty thoroughly and had very little trouble getting it reattached.

    I thought it was absurd to have to take the back seat out to get at the battery in my Audi, but this makes the Audi look like simple and elegant--at least that only took two screws and then the battery was easy to reach!
    this is old news and you would think there is a safer way than having power with jumper cables hooked up i would think like a power source for the cig lighter

  4. #3
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    This is interesting. I changed the battery in my 02 GLX last year. Although I did have to remove the cowl cover as you indicated, I did not have to remove the wipers and that other piece by the windshield. I also did not provide any alternate power while the battery was out and the car started up and ran fine.

    The only thing I thought sucked was the back pain that results afterwards.
    JHigs likes this.

  5. #4
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    I'd have to second the "no throttle body adaptation required after battery removal" experience. (2004.5 GLS 5MT)

    I recently removed both battery cables and a Monsoon double DIN for more than one hour while installing an icelink. The dash trip odometer apparently reset to 0, but both the TB and the Monsoon seemed to function perfectly without resetting despite the long voltage interruption.

  6. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by bvariant View Post
    I'd have to second the "no throttle body adaptation required after battery removal" experience. (2004.5 GLS 5MT)

    I recently removed both battery cables and a Monsoon double DIN for more than one hour while installing an icelink. The dash trip odometer apparently reset to 0, but both the TB and the Monsoon seemed to function perfectly without resetting despite the long voltage interruption.
    Folks:

    I based this part of the writeup on the experiences of others - there were several warnings in other threads about Throttle Body Adaptation problems after battery removals. I can't personally say I had problems with this, but it seemed like several others did.

    Bottom line: As always, your mileage may vary.

  7. #6
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    I have replaced my battery twice and neither time did I remove anything other than the battery cables and clamps. The 1st battery was OEM, the second was a Sears DieFast and now I have a Autozone Dura something.

    However my car will not even start without a TBA after a battery change. Mine is a 99 !.8T AEB. No problem though, I have a vag-com.

    John

  8. #7
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    I can tell you that on a my 2000 B5, you do not have to do all those steps. Also, there is no cowl cover on a B5. Once you remove the hold down bracket and disconnect the terminals, the battery can be lifted out although it is somewhat a tight fit and in an awkward position to easily lift out. I'm on my third battery. Also, I have disconnected my negative terminal many, many times when doing electrical work on the car and have never had to do a throttle body adaptation and the monsoon radio works everytime without having to enter the radio code.

    If you're worried about having to do a TBA or do not want to lose the seat / mirror memory functions, radio presets, etc. You can buy an adapter to plug into the lighter so you won't loose these functions.


    Bottom line: don't believe everything you read.
    Last edited by kenblasko; 09-29-2007 at 08:37 PM.

  9. #8
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    Was the car upside down?

  10. #9
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    I have a 2001 B5 Passat and had to replace my battery yesterday. Here in Canada I bought the "Motomaster Eliminator (10-4800-8)", cost me $126

    Undid the hold-down bolt on the passenger side with a 13mm socket and extension

    Undid the negative then positive terminal

    Popped off the vent hose with a screwdriver

    Grabbed the handles (OEM battery) and was able to tilt it towards the front of the engine and pull out

    Slipped the new battery in, and performed the above steps in reverse

    Started up like a champ and all I had to change was the clock, and the trip odo was reset to 0 - radio presets remained, took it for a test drive and it the engine ran just as good as before

    Surprisingly easy compared to most things on this car... so that's my story to build confidence for anyone who needs to do this

  11. #10
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    You're thinking way too hard about the procedure if you are removing the wipers and rain tray.

    Just disconnect the cables, remove the 13mm bolt and bracket, and rip the damn thing out of the car. lol

  12. #11
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    Yes, but in places where there are 4 seasons, the plastic water deflector gets brittle in the cold and will most likely crack as you yank out the battery (since batteries die out usually in the winter too).

    That didn't stop me from yanking it out of my B5.5, but it seems that there is less clearance in the B5.5 with the redesign.

  13. #12
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    After reading all this, I think I had better have a VW technician at the dealership change my battery. I would like to do it myself but I think something might get screwed up. What do you think?????

  14. #13
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    Well, it's not as easy as most cars but not off the chart difficultly wise. If you have a Costco nearby they have the group 48 battery for $59 last time I was there. Prepare for $200-300 bill from the dealer.

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    I agree with the part number for the battery. I have a B5.5 and did not have to remove anything but one plastic shield above the battery:

    Battery confusion

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    Well I just changed mine on a 2003 passat wagon 4motion. No problems whats so ever.
    remove cover
    remove hold bown bolt
    remove ground
    remove positive
    remove vent tube
    tilt battery forward and slide out

    reverse for new battery that I got at autozone for 89.99

  17. #16
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    Ditto on the easy change. Well, also ditto on the "oh my god this thing is heavy" comments. The hardest part, even at 6'3", is reaching over the car to drag the thing out without creaming anything else.

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    Changed mine this past winter.

    In the rain, the battery must have shorted, because the car was running when it died. No problems at all, doesn't have a cover, just a clamp bolt.
    It's a 2000 B5 ATW Wagon, no TBA required, no Monsoon codes to enter, just started it and drove away. This was in a parking lot with a 10mm wrench.

  19. #18
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    I also had an easy replacement on a 2003 Volks Passat 1.8T using a Group 48 battery to replace the original. Battery was $94. I used a "memory saver" ($4 from auto zone) with a 9V battery and still lost my clock setting but did not loose radio presets or experience any other problems. I've posted pictures of the replacement if anyone is interested

  20. #19
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    easy battery replacement...

    It's surprising that battery replacement experiences could be so different. In my case, I found it quite easy...in fact, I've replaced the battery once my my '99 Passat V6 and just today on my '03 Passat 1.8T. (Side note: I ended up with a battery from VW as they were on sale ($110) and the battery that came with the car lasted nearly 9 yrs so I figured why messy with success.)

    Anyway, on both cars, my process has been:

    1) pull back weather-stripping
    2) slide/lift out deflector
    3) remove single 13mm hold-down bolt and bracket (the '03 has a nice little handle to grab the bracket, can't remember if the '99 does)
    4) remove negative and positive cables (10mm box wrench), tucking them out of the way so contact is not possible and/or covering them/battery posts
    5) remove battery (on the '03, sliding about 1/4" towards driver's side, lifting passenger side up to ~45 degree angle, slide battery up and out passenger side at the same 45 degree angle. The battery will bind slightly on the deflector that is still attached to teh base of the windshield, but it will flex plenty.
    6) clean battery terminals with wire brush
    7) repeat steps 5) through 1) in reverse order

    On the '99, the battery is different (not as wide, group 48 I think) though the steps were the same....none of the complicated removal mentioned in this thread.

    Honestly, on both cars I spent more time cleaning out leaves while the battery was out than I did replacing the battery. If I didn't want to clean up things I'm confident this could be a 10min job.

    So, why the range of difficulty? Some possibilities:

    1. simplified extraction: at first glance, I thought I would have to remove a lot more than I did to get to the battery...in the end, a few tricks (slightly lower hood to pull of weatherstrip near hood support, flex deflector slightly when removing battery, etc.) made it much simpler than expected. Perhaps some are taking out more than is needed.
    2. VW battery: I went the route of VW battery (or what they sold me a dealer - branded VW, Skoda, Audi, etc. - which was actually cheaper than bosch from Pep Boys) so the fit was identical.
    3. VIN specific luck: VW asked for the VIN as they said there were 3 different batteries fro my '02 1.8T Passat. Perhaps those that have the other 2 types have a more difficult geometry to deal with.
    Finally, on the continuous power to the car thing, I considered it and decided to risk it Just disconnecting the battery. (In fact, this time on the '03 I made a trip to get the battery with the old on out so I could core exchange took 45min or so.) No problem in either case. On the '03 the only noticeable thing was that the radio was re-set from FM2 to FM1 (though all my presets are still there). On the '99 I seem to remember needing to enter a radio security code but I'm not sure.

    Anyway, these are my experiences. I wish more had it this easy...PM me if I can provide further details on this.
    Cheers,
    ATC

  21. #20
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    My experience as well, on both my 2000 and 2004. I think the complex disassembly comes from the Bentley manual, which recommends removing the apron around the wiper arms. I suppose if the apron were brittle from age or cold weather you might break it, as it does have to flex for removal. Me, I just changed my batteries during the summer (when they were seven years old, and before they failed.)

  22. #21
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    what size battery did you use on your b5 1.8t

  23. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by jujtacoma2010 View Post
    what size battery did you use on your b5 1.8t
    Me, I used an original VW battery from the dealer. The battery in the car when I got it was a Sears Diehard (group 48) that didn't fit quite right. The VW battery isn't a common size.

  24. #23
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    I'm seriously confused I was able to replace the battery in my sedan without any of that and then remove it after being hit head on by a semi. It's in my current Passat now

  25. #24
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    I changed the battery on my '99 B5 Passat a while ago and had zero problems. I didn't have to remove anything extraneous except the clamps holding the battery. The car ran fine without having to do anything like using an auxiliary battery to keep power applied during the swap.

    FWIW, the OEM battery in my Passat lasted longer than any other car I've ever owned. I think I got at least 9 or 10 years out of it before requiring replacement.

  26. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by mdgorelick View Post
    This was the most insanely difficult battery replacement ever. I can't believe how hard VW made it to get at the battery on this car! I figured, "hey, how hard can this be?" Then I started reading a few other posts on this topic and figured I had better proceed with caution.

    A few caveats about doing this replacement that I learned from other threads on this forum:

    1. If you disconnect the power to the ECU, the car loses track of an adjustment for the throttle body and the car runs like crap, if at all. You will then (most likely) need a VAG-COM to reset the adjustment. Moral of the story: Provide another power source to the car while replacing its battery.

    2. Make VERY sure the battery you get fits properly. Some other posters have reported that the replacements they got were slightly too small and/or lacked the hydrogen vent hole (charging batteries give off hydrogen...hydrogen + spark = BOOM)

    So, here is the detailed writeup on how to perform this task:

    1. Locate the correct size battery. The proper size is 94R. Accept no substitutes; many sources have the wrong size code in their books.

    2. Peel back the weather seal that helps retain the plastic cover over the battery, master cylinder and ECU area.

    3. Remove the plastic cover. This reveals the battery but does not provide enough clearance to actually remove it.

    4. Remove the metal retaining clip that holds the battery in place. There is a hard-to-see bolt (13mm) that has to come out; it's just forward of the battery. You'll need an extension for your socket wrench.

    The "water deflector" (a.k.a. the cowl, attached to the bottom of the windshield) has to come off to provide full clearance for the battery to be removed.

    5. Remove the wipers...not the blades, the wipers themselves! This is done by popping the plastic bolt caps off with a flatblade screwdriver and then removing the 13mm nuts that hold the wiper arms in place. Mine were stuck pretty bad--I had to really work at them to get them to come off. A bit of penetrating oil and a rubber mallet are your friends here. Wiggling them back and forth finally got them loose after pounding on them for a while. Make note of where the wipers line up against the windshield before removing them completely.

    6. Remove the "hinge covers" at the edges of the water deflector. This will require a Torx T-30 tool. I had to move the hood up and down a bit to work them loose and remove them.

    7. Remove the two metal clips from the leading edge of the water deflector. This can be done by hand.

    8. Remove the water deflector.

    9. While the battery terminals are still connected to the battery, attach a set of jumper cables to them while leaving room to still loosen the terminal nuts. Connect the jumper cables to another power source, such as an extra battery or another car. This is crucial since if you disconnect power from the car, you will lose crucial ECU settings for the "Throttle body adaptation." Search the forums for this term to see what I am talking about.

    10. Carefully remove the battery terminals...WITHOUT interrupting the connection to the external power source!

    11. Disconnect the vent hose from the side of the battery.

    12. Now, after all of that, you can FINALLY remove the battery. Be careful not to knock the jumper cables off the battery terminals! Having someone hold the positive terminal out of the way is a big help here. The sucker is HEAVY, watch out!

    13. Put the new battery in the car and carefully reconnect the terminals. Again, use caution not to knock the jumper cables loose.

    14. Reassemble all the crap you had to take off the car. A few choice curse words for the German engineers that made this task so difficult are a fine companion to this task.

    FYI: A few posters on this site have mentioned that the area at the bottom of the windshield must be VERY clean before the water deflector will reattach properly. One even mentioned that a small stone got trapped beneath the deflector and cracked his windshield! As such, I cleaned mine pretty thoroughly and had very little trouble getting it reattached.

    I thought it was absurd to have to take the back seat out to get at the battery in my Audi, but this makes the Audi look like simple and elegant--at least that only took two screws and then the battery was easy to reach!

    Wow. I could replace my battery in half the time than you took to type this. I just unhook the cables and it pulls out easily. That's all.

  27. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by RxRC View Post
    Wow. I could replace my battery in half the time than you took to type this. I just unhook the cables and it pulls out easily. That's all.
    To be fair, a lot of it parallels the official instructions in the Bentley manual. Most of which, as I and others have commented, is usually unnecessary. There are a lot of complicated repair procedures in every industry, not just cars, that are required to be absolutely sure the repair goes well - and which no-one actually follows.

    I should comment on the use of auxiliary power. I regard the above instructions, which seem to involve using a parallel battery or charger, as dangerous. It's ALSO not recommended to use the typical "settings savers" as described in post #7. The problem with the former should be obvious; the latter typically uses a 9V battery that VW warns is insufficient to keep the settings. Instead, they can be corrupted without actually resetting, which can cause all sorts of problems.

    VW warns the TB adaption may be lost, and presumes you'll simply re-do it as necessary. However, in several changes of batteries in both B5's and B5.5's, I've never had this happen - another example of an over-conservative manual. In each case, I lost only the clock, trip odometer, and window auto-up settings. No big deal.

    So please, no auxiliary power.

  28. #27
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    While I am a newb to the Passat world, from poking around under the hood of my B5.5, I sure don't see much of an issue with a battery change.

    Try a Sebring 'vert. Need to remove the driver's side front tire to get access to the battery for removal.

  29. #28
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    Folks, I missed an important point with regard to my experiences with my battery: This procedure is specific to the W8. I thought I'd specified this in the original writeup, but having looked at it again (7 years later!), I obviously forgot to point that out. :-(

    I've now had to do this on two different W8s, and I can ASSURE you that you've got to pull all this crap off the car because the battery on this thing is gigantic. So, if you've got a 4- or 6-cylinder car, you probably can just pull the cover off the battery compartment and you're good to go. Not so on the W8s, though.

  30. #29
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    Ya I cracked the water deflector pulling my battery out. Looking to buy a new one now.

  31. #30
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    best investment is to get rid of the battery cover. IMO

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